The Effects of Expressive Writing on Adjustment to HIV

Inna D. Rivkin; Julie Gustafson; Ilene Weingarten; Dorothy Chin

DISCLOSURES

AIDS and Behavior. 2006;10(1):13-26.

Previous research suggests that writing about stressful experiences results in better health and psychological well-being. In the present study, a multi-ethnic sample of 79 HIV-positive women and men participated in a structured interview, and wrote about either their deepest thoughts and feelings about living with HIV (expressive writing) or their activities in the last 24 hr (control). Sixty-two participants returned for the 2-month follow-up and 50 returned for the 6-month follow-up interview. Oral fluid samples of beta2-microglobulin were taken at the baseline and follow-up assessments to examine the immunological effects of writing. No effects of writing condition were found, but expressive writing participants who included increasing insight/causation and social words in their writing had better immune function and reported more positive changes at follow-up. Results suggest that cognitive processing and changes in social interactions may be critical to the benefits of writing.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/536484

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Gender-specific effects of an augmented written emotional disclosure intervention on posttraumatic, depressive, and HIV-disease-related outcomes: a randomized, controlled trial.

J Consult Clin Psychol. 2013 Apr;81(2):284-98. doi: 10.1037/a0030814. Epub 2012 Dec 17.

Ironson G1, O’Cleirigh C, Leserman J, Stuetzle R, Fordiani J, Fletcher M, Schneiderman N.

Trauma histories and symptoms of PTSD occur at very high rates in people with HIV and are associated with poor disease management and accelerated disease progression. The authors of this study examined the efficacy of a brief written trauma disclosure intervention on posttraumatic stress, depression, HIV-related physical symptoms, and biological markers of HIV disease progression.

METHOD:

HIV-infected men and women were randomized to four 30-min expressive writing sessions in either a treatment (trauma writing) or an attention control (daily events writing) condition. The disclosure intervention augmented the traditional emotional disclosure paradigm with probes to increase processing by focusing on trauma appraisals, self-worth, and problem solving. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 1-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up.

RESULTS:

Hierarchical linear modeling (N = 244, intent-to-treat analyses) revealed no significant treatment effects for the group as a whole. Gender by treatment group interactions were significant such that women in the trauma-writing group had significantly reduced posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms (p = .017), depression (p = .009), and HIV-related symptoms (p = .022) compared with their controls. In contrast, men in the trauma-treatment condition did not improve more than controls on any outcome variables. Unexpectedly, men in the daily-event-writing control group had significantly greater reductions in depression then men in the trauma-writing group. Treatment effects were magnified in women when the analysis was restricted to those with elevated PTSD symptoms at baseline.

CONCLUSIONS:

A brief (4-session) guided written emotional disclosure intervention resulted in significant and meaningful reductions in PTSD, depression, and physical symptoms for women with HIV, but not for men.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23244367

Emotional and physical health benefits of expressive writing

Karen A. Baikie, Kay Wilhelm

Medical conditions that might benefit from expressive writing programmes

  • Lung functioning in asthma

  • Disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis

  • Pain and physical health in cancer

  • Immune response in HIV infection

  • Hospitalisations for cystic fibrosis

  • Pain intensity in women with chronic pelvic pain

  • Sleep-onset latency in poor sleepers

  • Post-operative course

http://apt.rcpsych.org/content/11/5/338