Using Expressive Writing to Explore Thoughts and Beliefs about Cancer and Treatment among Chinese American Immigrant Breast Cancer Survivors

Psychooncology. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2017 Nov 1.
Published in final edited form as:
Psychooncology. 2016 Nov; 25(11): 1371ā€“1374.

Published online 2015 Sep 25. doi:Ā  10.1002/pon.3991

Qian Lu, Ph.D., M.D.,1 Nelson C. Y. Yeung, M.Phil.,1 Jin You, Ph.D.,2 and Jiajie Dai, M.S.1
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Expressive disclosure to improve well-being in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a randomised, controlled trial.

Psychol Health. 2013;28(6):701-13. doi: 10.1080/08870446.2012.754891. Epub 2013 Jan 7.

Averill AJ1, Kasarskis EJ, Segerstrom SC.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a terminal neurological disease associated with progressive paralysis, loss of communicative ability and functional decline. Expressive disclosure may help people with ALS, particularly those who are emotionally or socially inhibited, meet psychological challenges associated with the disease. People with ALS (Nā€‰=ā€‰48) were randomised to expressive disclosure about their disease or no disclosure. Psychological well-being (affect, depression and quality of life) was assessed pre-intervention and also three and six months later. Results of multi-level models indicated that the group that disclosed thoughts and feelings about ALS had higher well-being than the control group at three months post-intervention, but not six months. Ambivalence over emotional expression (AEE) moderated three-month post-intervention well-being. Those low in AEE had higher well-being than those high in AEE regardless of condition. Those high in AEE, who disclosed, had increased well-being from pre-intervention, whereas controls had decreased well-being from pre-intervention. Expressive disclosure may be helpful for people with ALS, but only those who have difficulty expressing emotions. In addition, the intervention had only temporary effects; the dynamic challenges of ALS progression may mean that the effect of processing thoughts and feelings about the disease in one stage may not generalise to later stages.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4302768/

Self-report and linguistic indicators of emotional expression in narratives as predictors of adjustment to cancer.

J Behav Med. 2006 Aug;29(4):335-45. Epub 2006 Jul 15.

Owen JE1, Giese-Davis J, Cordova M, Kronenwetter C, Golant M, Spiegel D.

Emotional expression and cognitive efforts to adapt to cancer have been linked to better psychological adjustment. However, little is known about the relationship between linguistic indicators of emotional and cognitive coping efforts and corresponding self-report measures of related constructs. In this study, we sought to evaluate the interrelationships between self-reports of emotional suppression and linguistic indicators of emotional and cognitive coping efforts in those living with cancer. Seventy-one individuals attending a community cancer support group completed measures of emotional suppression and mood disturbance and provided a written narrative describing their cancer experience. Self-reports of emotional suppression were associated with more rather than less distress. Although linguistic indicators of both emotional expression and cognitive processing were generally uncorrelated with self-report measures of emotional suppression and mood disturbance, a significant interaction was observed between emotional suppression and use of cognitive words on mood disturbance. Among those using higher levels of emotional suppression, increasing use of cognitive words was associated with greater levels of mood disturbance. These findings have implications for a) the therapeutic use of emotion in psychosocial interventions and b) the use of computer-assisted technologies to conduct content analysis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16845583