How to Use Journaling to Cope With PTSD

https://www.verywellmind.com/how-to-use-journaling-to-cope-with-ptsd-2797594

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Differential efficacy of written emotional disclosure for subgroups of fibromyalgia patients.

Br J Health Psychol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2009 Oct 8.
Published in final edited form as:

Objectives

To identify differential health benefits of written emotional disclosure (ED).

Methods

Pain-coping style and demographic characteristics were examined as potential moderators of ED treatment efficacy in a randomized controlled trial with female fibromyalgia patients.

Results

Of three pain-coping styles, only patients classified as interpersonally distressed (ID) experienced significant treatment effects on psychological well-being, pain, and fatigue. Treatment effects on psychological well-being were also significantly greater for patients with a high level of education.

Conclusions

Patients with an ID-coping style and/or high education appear to benefit most from ED.

Community writing as a learning experience

Pages 107-113 | Published online: 10 Nov 2010

This brief report examines community writing as part of a community arts programme at The Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (NDG) Food Depot in Montreal. We chose the locale of a food bank because we wanted to improve the life-coping mechanisms of food recipients and to empower them, through the arts, to have the self-confidence to join the mainstream of society.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0889-3670310001596266

Poetry writing as a healing method in coping with a special needs child: A narrative perspective

Pages 117-125 | Published online: 09 May 2011

The focus of this article is on the role poetry writing plays in helping those bereaved or depressed to cope with their emotions. Through a therapeutic process of applying her thoughts to writing poetry, the author, mother of a special needs child, expresses herself and the trauma of her experience. The writer utilizes free verse to allow thoughts to freely form on the page instead of forcing them into a tightly constructed form that might hinder the therapeutic writing process.

Expressive writing among Chinese American breast cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial.

Health Psychol. 2017 Apr;36(4):370-379. doi: 10.1037/hea0000449. Epub 2016 Dec 8.

Lu Q1, Wong CC1, Gallagher MW1, Tou RY1, Young L2, Loh A2.

Despite the significant size of the Asian American population, few studies have been conducted to improve cancer survivorship in this underserved group. Research has demonstrated that expressive writing interventions confer physical and psychological benefits for a variety of populations, including Non-Hispanic White cancer survivors. The study aims to evaluate the health benefits of an expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors in the U.S. It was hypothesized that expressive writing would increase health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

METHOD:

Ninety-six Chinese breast cancer survivors were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 writing conditions: a self-regulation group, an emotional disclosure group, or a cancer-fact group. The self-regulation group wrote about one’s deepest feelings and coping efforts in addition to finding benefits from their cancer experience. The emotional disclosure group wrote about one’s deepest thoughts and feelings. The cancer-fact group wrote about facts relevant to their cancer experience. HRQOL was assessed by FACT-B at baseline, 1, 3, and 6-month follow-ups. Effect sizes and residual zed change models were used to compare group differences in HRQOL.

RESULTS:

Contrary to expectations, the cancer-fact group reported the highest level of overall quality of life at the 6-month follow-up. The self-regulation group had higher emotional well-being compared to the emotional disclosure group.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study challenges the implicit assumption that psychosocial interventions validated among Non-Hispanic Whites could be directly generalized to other populations. It suggests that Asians may benefit from writing instructions facilitating more cognitive than emotional processes.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27929333

A pilot study of expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors.

Health Psychol. 2012 Sep;31(5):548-51. doi: 10.1037/a0026834. Epub 2012 Jan 9.

Lu Q1, Zheng D, Young L, Kagawa-Singer M, Loh A.

Little attention has been focused on Asian American breast cancer survivor’s psychological needs. No outcome-based psychosocial interventions have been reported to target at this population. Expressive writing interventions have been previously shown to improve health outcomes among non-Hispanic White breast cancer populations. This pilot study aimed to test the cultural sensitivity, feasibility, and potential health benefits of an expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors.

METHODS:

Participants (N = 19) were asked to write about their deepest thoughts and feelings, their coping efforts, and positive thoughts and feelings regarding their experience with breast cancer each week for 3 weeks. Health outcomes were assessed at baseline, 3, and 6 months after the intervention. A Community-Based Participatory Research Approach (CBPR) is used.

RESULTS:

Expressive writing was associated with medium and large effect sizes (η(p)² = 0.066∼0.208) in improving multiple health outcomes (quality of life, fatigue, posttraumatic stress, intrusive thoughts, and positive affect) at follow-ups. Participants perceived the study to be valuable. The study yielded high compliance and completion rates.

CONCLUSION:

Expressive writing is associated with long-term improvement of health outcomes among Chinese breast cancer survivors and has the potential to be utilized as a support strategy for minority cancer survivors. In addition, CBPR is valuable in improving feasibility and cultural sensitivity of the intervention in understudied populations. Future studies employing randomized, controlled trial designs are warranted.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22229930