“Finding the unexpected”: An account of a writing group for women with chronic pelvic pain

Pages 95-103 | Published online: 14 May 2012

The focus of this article is on a creative writing group developed for women with chronic pelvic pain. The authors address whether their experiences have anything to say about how creative writing sits within the current Western health paradigm and its approach to people who suffer from medically unexplained symptoms.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08893675.2012.680724

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A pilot study of expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors.

Health Psychol. 2012 Sep;31(5):548-51. doi: 10.1037/a0026834. Epub 2012 Jan 9.

Lu Q1, Zheng D, Young L, Kagawa-Singer M, Loh A.

Little attention has been focused on Asian American breast cancer survivor’s psychological needs. No outcome-based psychosocial interventions have been reported to target at this population. Expressive writing interventions have been previously shown to improve health outcomes among non-Hispanic White breast cancer populations. This pilot study aimed to test the cultural sensitivity, feasibility, and potential health benefits of an expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors.

METHODS:

Participants (N = 19) were asked to write about their deepest thoughts and feelings, their coping efforts, and positive thoughts and feelings regarding their experience with breast cancer each week for 3 weeks. Health outcomes were assessed at baseline, 3, and 6 months after the intervention. A Community-Based Participatory Research Approach (CBPR) is used.

RESULTS:

Expressive writing was associated with medium and large effect sizes (η(p)² = 0.066∼0.208) in improving multiple health outcomes (quality of life, fatigue, posttraumatic stress, intrusive thoughts, and positive affect) at follow-ups. Participants perceived the study to be valuable. The study yielded high compliance and completion rates.

CONCLUSION:

Expressive writing is associated with long-term improvement of health outcomes among Chinese breast cancer survivors and has the potential to be utilized as a support strategy for minority cancer survivors. In addition, CBPR is valuable in improving feasibility and cultural sensitivity of the intervention in understudied populations. Future studies employing randomized, controlled trial designs are warranted.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22229930

Writing therapy: a new tool for general practice?

Br J Gen Pract. 2012 Dec; 62(605): 661–663.
Soul Mugerwa, GP

Park House Surgery, St Helens
John D Holden, GP

Garswood Surgery, St Helens
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3505408/full text https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3505408/

Emotional disclosure interventions for chronic pain: from the laboratory to the clinic.

Transl Behav Med. 2012 Mar;2(1):73-81. doi: 10.1007/s13142-011-0085-4.

Lumley MA1, Sklar ER, Carty JN.

Life stress and the avoidance of negative emotions may contribute to chronic pain. The technique of written or spoken emotional disclosure can reverse emotional avoidance and improve health, and 18 randomized studies have tested it among people with chronic pain. We review these studies to provide guidance for the clinical use of this technique. The benefits of emotional disclosure for chronic pain are quite modest overall. Studies in rheumatoid arthritis show very limited effects, but two studies in fibromyalgia suggest that disclosure may be beneficial. Effects in other populations (headaches, cancer pain, pelvic pain, abdominal pain) are mixed. Moderator findings suggest that some patients are more likely to benefit than others. Emotional disclosure has been tested in well-controlled efficacy trials, leaving many unanswered questions related to translating this technique to practice. Issues needing further study include determining disclosure’s effects outside of randomized controlled trials, identifying the optimal pain populations and specific individuals to target for disclosure, presenting a valid rationale for disclosure, selecting the location and method of disclosure, and choosing between cognitive-behavioral or emotional disclosure techniques.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22905067

full text

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3419371/