Differential efficacy of written emotional disclosure for subgroups of fibromyalgia patients.

Br J Health Psychol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2009 Oct 8.
Published in final edited form as:

Objectives

To identify differential health benefits of written emotional disclosure (ED).

Methods

Pain-coping style and demographic characteristics were examined as potential moderators of ED treatment efficacy in a randomized controlled trial with female fibromyalgia patients.

Results

Of three pain-coping styles, only patients classified as interpersonally distressed (ID) experienced significant treatment effects on psychological well-being, pain, and fatigue. Treatment effects on psychological well-being were also significantly greater for patients with a high level of education.

Conclusions

Patients with an ID-coping style and/or high education appear to benefit most from ED.

EMOTIONAL BENEFITS OF EXPRESSIVE WRITING IN A SAMPLE OF ROMANIAN FEMALE CANCER PATIENTS

Cogniţie, Creier, Comportament / Cognition, Brain, Behavior
Copyright © 2008 Romanian Association for Cognitive Science. All rights reserved. ISSN: 1224-8398
Volume XII, No.1 (March), 115 – 129

 

The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible positive effects of the Expressive Writing paradigm on a sample of Romanian female cancer patients. The major tenet of this paradigm is that if individuals with high levels of distress express in writing, for three or four consecutive writing sessions, their deepest thoughts and emotions regarding the activating event and its consequences, on the follow-up assessment they would experience significantly lower levels of distress, and improved physical and/or psychological functioning. Our study has evinced, that the participants of the sample we investigated has experienced at the follow-up assessment significantly lower levels of distress, and significantly higher levels of positive meaning in life and benefit finding, however, the results may depend on the pre-intervention levels of depression. Nevertheless, the Expressive Writing task has not significantly contributed in our sample to the enhancement of the levels of positive emotions.

http://www.ascred.ro/images/attach/Emotional%20benefits%20of%20expressive%20writing%20in%20a%20sample%20of%20romanian%20female%20cancer%20patients.pdf

 

Figures of grief: metaphors from a bereavement writing group.

Omega (Westport). 2007-2008;56(4):359-67.

Young E1.

In a community-based bereavement writing group, patterns of metaphor emerged and helped the group members identify and deal with particularly challenging aspects of death and grief, including taboo subjects such as abuse and suicide. The metaphors show how a bereavement writing group functioned to address the needs of people coping with different kinds of grief effectively and efficiently. Analysis of the specific metaphors suggests why figurative language enabled the group to bond quickly and strongly, delve into the complex emotions death elicits, and integrate experiences of loss and grief safely and productively. The patterns of metaphors the group produced in their writing about death and grief are discussed in terms of bereavement processes, and the topics the group used to elicit the figures of speech are presented for further refinement and use.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18435327

Minority stressors and dual identities: an analysis of lesbians’ expressive writing journals.

J Lesbian Stud. 2008;12(4):501-17. doi: 10.1080/10894160802278663.

The purpose of the current study was to examine the content of the expressive writing journals of female sexual minorities. In addition, the relationship between the content of expressive writing journals and mood and perceived stress measured two months later was examined. Journal content was also examined as a function of demographic characteristics. Thirty-nine participants each wrote a total of six journal entries about significant stressful or traumatic events or recurring problems they have experienced as lesbians. Topics that participants wrote about were differentness, leading a double life, coming out, discrimination, rejection, fears of rejection and safety, self-acceptance, and same- and opposite-sex intimate experiences. Themes of feeling different, negative coming out experiences, and negative same-sex intimate experiences were associated with more psychological distress two months after the expressive writing exercise. Occupational level was associated with themes related to leading a double life and negative same-sex and coming out experiences. These results are considered in light of the unique minority stressors experienced by lesbians as well as the difficulties inherent in lesbians having ties to both lesbian and heterosexual cultures.

Expressive writing in context: the effects of a confessional setting and delivery of instructions on participant experience and language in writing.

Br J Health Psychol. 2008 Feb;13(Pt 1):27-30. doi: 10.1348/135910707X250929.

Corter AL1, Petrie KJ.

Manipulations of the setting and instructions were tested for effects on language use and reported health following expressive writing (EW).

METHODS:

Participants (N=76) wrote in one of three conditions that differed by setting and the delivery of writing instructions.

RESULTS:

The results showed that altering the context for EW influences participants’ language use and their perceptions of the experience. There was no effect of conditions on self-reported health.

CONCLUSIONS:

Future research should attend to the ways in which manipulations of EW context affect proposed mediators such as language, as well as outcomes of EW.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18230226

Expressive writing reduces avoidance and somatic complaints in a community sample with constraints on expression.

Br J Health Psychol. 2008 Feb;13(Pt 1):53-6. doi: 10.1348/135910707X251180.

Swanbon T1, Boyce L, Greenberg MA.

This experimental study examined expressive writing (EW) in a community sample with social constraints on self-expression. Gay men (N=62) were assigned randomly to describe gay-related thoughts and feelings (EW) or to write objectively (CTRL). Self-reported symptoms and physician visits were assessed at baseline and 1- and 2-month follow-ups.

RESULTS:

Significant GroupxTime interaction for somatic symptoms indicated buffering effect of EW. EW reduced gay-related avoidance, relative to CTRL. Avoidance and symptom changes were significantly, positively associated.

CONCLUSIONS:

Consistent with inhibition theory, EW reduces chronic avoidance and buffers stress-related physical symptoms in stigmatized groups.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18230232