“Finding the unexpected”: An account of a writing group for women with chronic pelvic pain

Pages 95-103 | Published online: 14 May 2012

The focus of this article is on a creative writing group developed for women with chronic pelvic pain. The authors address whether their experiences have anything to say about how creative writing sits within the current Western health paradigm and its approach to people who suffer from medically unexplained symptoms.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08893675.2012.680724

Writing in solidarity: the lived experience of African American adolescent girls writing poetry

Pages 1-14 | Received 25 Jul 2017, Accepted 15 Sep 2017, Published online: 28 Nov 2017

This article offers an expansion of the poetry writing and research featured in “Culturally Responsive Poetry” published in the Journal of Poetry Therapy in 2011. In this article, a follow up to the coeducational poetry pilot is provided through the experiences of African American adolescent girl poets. “Writing in Solidarity: The Lived Experience of African American Adolescent Girls Writing Poetry” is the outcome of an in-depth phenomenological research study exploring the lived experience of eight African American female high school students participating in an after school poetry group. The process of writing in solidarity is one of call and response that evokes a sense of understanding and concern for one’s self, poetry group members and community. Through this writing process, a sense of sisterhood is forged for the adolescent girls and the power of individual and collective naming (to call forth one’s own identity or identities) uncovered.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08893675.2018.1396725

Community writing as a learning experience

Pages 107-113 | Published online: 10 Nov 2010

This brief report examines community writing as part of a community arts programme at The Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (NDG) Food Depot in Montreal. We chose the locale of a food bank because we wanted to improve the life-coping mechanisms of food recipients and to empower them, through the arts, to have the self-confidence to join the mainstream of society.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0889-3670310001596266

The healing power of writing: applying the expressive/creative component of poetry therapy

Pages 141-154 | Published online: 20 Feb 2007

The healing aspects of writing are explored in this article. This includes an overview of the evidence for the use of writing in therapeutic capacities, as well as a discussion of the limitations. A case study involving the use of journaling with a client suffering from Lupus is presented. Brief illustrations of the use of writing in couple, family and group modalities are also presented.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08893670412331311352

A systematic writing program as a tool in the grief process: part 1.

Patient Prefer Adherence. 2010 Dec 6;4:425-31. doi: 10.2147/PPA.S14864.

Furnes B1, Dysvik E.

The basic aim of this paper is to suggest a flexible and individualized writing program as a tool for use during the grief process of bereaved adults.

METHODS:

An open, qualitative approach following distinct steps was taken to gain a broad perspective on the grief and writing processes, as a platform for the writing program.

RESULTS:

Following several systematic methodological steps, we arrived at suggestions for the initiation of a writing program and its structure and substance, with appropriate guidelines.

DISCUSSION:

We believe that open and expressive writing, including free writing and focused writing, may have beneficial effects on a person experiencing grief. These writing forms may be undertaken and systematized through a writing program, with participation in a grief writing group and with diary writing, to achieve optimal results.

CONCLUSION:

A structured writing program might be helpful in promoting thought activities and as a tool to increase the coherence and understanding of individuals in the grief process. Our suggested program may also be a valuable guide to future program development and research.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3003609/

Community of writing people

Kathleen Adams:

Community also changes us. We learn that we are not alone. We see ourselves reflected in another’s compassionate eyes. We hold for each other what we cannot reliably hang onto for ourselves.

Expressive writing may change the way you see the world. Writing communities have the power to deepen and accelerate the process of change.

(from “Your Brain on Ink”)